Page 2 of 4

Re: Trivia

Posted: Sun Oct 23, 2016 1:06 pm
by ajsuff
......................... from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1884, Eleanor Roosevelt was born in New York City, New York. The politician, diplomat and activist is best known for being the longest-serving First Lady of the United States. But did you know she also had formidable radio savvy? Read about that one time Eleanor Roosevelt was a DJ.

When Franklin Delano Roosevelt was president, he earned a reputation for being king of national media thanks to his savvy use of the radio. Though the 32nd president will always be remembered for his “fireside chats” addressing the nation, his wife’s radio savvy was just as formidable. During her White House years, Eleanor Roosevelt appeared on the radio more than 300 times. But her radio career lasted long after she was first lady—and in the 1950s, she even took to the radio as a request-granting DJ.


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-new ... MDYzNTUzS0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Wed Nov 02, 2016 10:33 am
by ajsuff
........................ from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1936, Benito Mussolini informally united Nazi Germany and fascist Italy during a speech where he referred to a Berlin-Rome "axis" around which "all European States animated by a desire for peace may collaborate on troubles." Though Il Duce wasn't the first to use the term "axis" as a way to speak of the power alliance (Hungarian premier Gyula Gömbös was), his use of the term popularized it, eventually making it the name for the countries fighting against the Allies in World War II.


Find out about the message Mussolini left behind in his obelisk that details the way he saw the world.
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-new ... e&spMailin

Re: Trivia

Posted: Mon Nov 07, 2016 10:26 pm
by ajsuff
........................ from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1911, Marie Curie became the only woman to have won multiple Nobel Prizes after she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for discovering the elements radium and polonium. Curie and her husband Pierre had been jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics eight years earlier. Discover some of the lesser-known women trailblazers who dedicated their lives to science and created a path for others to follow.


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-n ... ily&no-ist

Re: Trivia

Posted: Thu Nov 10, 2016 12:28 pm
by ajsuff
....................... from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1938, Nazis looted and burned Jewish businesses and synagogues in Germany and Austria. The incident, which is referred to as Kristallnacht or the "Night of Broken Glass" killed almost 100 people, and in its aftermath, some 30,000 men were arrested for being Jewish.


Check out rare footage that shows what everyday life in Nazi Austria was like during that time.
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/n ... Njk0NDkyS0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 11:52 am
by ajsuff
........................ from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1620, 41 English colonists aboard Mayflower, signed a compact calling for a "body politick." The Mayflower Compact, as it was called, was the first document that established the pilgrims would follow “just and equal Laws, Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions and Offices" when they went ashore.


Read how archaeologists are working to pinpoint the exact location of the famed Plymouth colony.
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-new ... MTg2ODg3S0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:37 pm
by ajsuff
....................... from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1577, Sir Francis Drake set sail from Plymouth, England, with five ships on a mission to circumnavigate the globe. His successful three-year mission made him the first Englishman to accomplish the feat. Find out why new evidence shows that during his travels he may have encountered Western Canada hundreds of years before it was officially charted by Spanish explorer Juan Perez.


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-new ... ODIxNzg0S0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Fri Dec 16, 2016 11:29 am
by ajsuff
...................... from the Smithsonian ..............................

Ever Wonder Who Invented The Tea Bag? - Its two competing origin stories are linked by one thing: convenience

Today, on International Tea Day, take a little time out of your busy life to learn about some tea history. Most of the tea in the United States is consumed using an invention that’s a little overone hundred years old: the tea bag. Before the tea bag, a whole pot of tea had to be made by pouring hot water over leaves in a tea strainer. The tea bag has two competing origin stories, writes Sarah Stone for Gizmodo


Learn more at:
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-new ... MzQ0MzE5S0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Sun Dec 18, 2016 1:41 pm
by ajsuff
.......................... from the Smithsonian ..............................

Wondering What A Bonfire Does to Your Lungs? We Answer Your Burning Questions

Setting large piles of stuff aflame can have significant environmental and human health impacts


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-n ... NTM5Njg2S0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Sun Dec 18, 2016 1:54 pm
by ajsuff
......................... from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1773, the Sons of Liberty dumped British tea into the Boston Harbor. The act of resistance infuriated the British parliament, which, as retribution, would soon pass the laws that American colonists called the Intolerable Acts. That, in turn, led the colonists to call for the first Continental Congress, putting in motion the steps that would lead the colonists to fight for their independence. Read about the myths of the American Revolution.


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/m ... NTM5Njg2S0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 9:23 pm
by ajsuff
........................ from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1732, Benjamin Franklin first published Poor Richard's Almanac. The proverb-packed book became a best-seller in colonial America. That was just one of Franklin's many literary contributions to the burgeoning republic.

One of the founding father's more quixotic quests was to create a new alphabet. No Q included


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-cult ... MDI4MDQwS0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Thu Dec 22, 2016 12:00 pm
by ajsuff
....................... from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1913, the first published crossword puzzle appeared in the New York World. It was the work of a journalist named Arthur Wynne, who was building upon the less sophisticated crosswords that had sprung up in England during the 19th century. Find out how the puzzle game turned into a worldwide phenomena.


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/w ... NDEyMjUzS0

(I do the D&C's daily for many years)

Re: Trivia

Posted: Sat Dec 24, 2016 3:56 pm
by ajsuff
...................... from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1864, Union General William T. Sherman sent a message to President Abraham Lincoln from Georgia. It read, "I beg to present you as a Christmas gift the city of Savannah." Sherman's March to the Sea, formally known as the Savannah Campaign, was a total war campaign that Sherman believed would speed up the end of the Civil War. See what life was like for enslaved African-Americans in Savannah before the war.


Studying Bacon Has Led One Smithsonian Scholar to New Insights on the Daily Life of Enslaved African-Americans - At Camp Bacon, a thinking person’s antidote to excess, historians, filmmakers and chefs gather to pay homage to the hog and its culinary renown


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsoni ... NjMzOTY3S0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Sat Dec 24, 2016 4:03 pm
by ajsuff
...................... from the Smithsonian ..............................

The Nazis Fought the Original War on Christmas

As they rose to power, party leaders sought to redefine the holiday to suit their own political needs



http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/n ... MjY0MDE2S0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Wed Dec 28, 2016 10:59 pm
by ajsuff
.................... from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1895, the first commercial movie was screened at the Grand Cafe in Paris. The film was created by the Lumiere brothers, Louis and Auguste, who pioneered the camera-projector called the Cinematographe. Commercial theaters would quickly follow, but popcorn, today's go-to movie treat, was initially banned from cinemas. Find out how the buttery treat popped its way into the hearts and stomachs of moviegoers.



http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-cult ... NzExNTY5S0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Sat Dec 31, 2016 12:07 pm
by ajsuff
................................... from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1922, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics was established. The Communist state was the first country in the world to be based on Marxist socialism. To understand the chain of events that led to the creation of the USSR, here's what you need to know first to understand the Russian Revolution.


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/w ... MTAxNTU5S0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Sun Jan 01, 2017 1:10 pm
by ajsuff
.................................. from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1904, Peter Pan debuted in London at the Duke of York's Theatre. The play about the Darling children and Peter Pan, the boy who never grows up, has become a classic children’s adventure tale. But not everything about the original story has aged well. Read the racist history of the native tribe depicted in Neverland.


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-cult ... NDY1Nzk5S0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Wed Jan 04, 2017 3:19 pm
by ajsuff
.................................. from the Smithsonian ..............................

Why Do We Play "Hail to the Chief" for the President? - A Scottish rebel features prominently in the anthem

Amid drummed ruffles and bugled flourishes, “Hail to the Chief” will be played twice in ear-ringing succession at this January’s inauguration, once for outgoing President Barack Obama and then again for incoming President Donald Trump. But there’s another chief in the mix whenever this song is played, and the peaceful transfer of power is the farthest thing from his mind. His name is Roderick Dhu, or Black Roderick, and he’s a bloody-minded medieval Scottish outlaw, albeit a fictional one. He hails from Sir Walter Scott’s “The Lady of the Lake,” an 1810 narrative poem, later a hit play, set in the 16th-century highlands. In one early scene, Roderick’s pike-wielding, tartan-clad clansmen serenade him with a lusty “Boat Song,” the source of our national tribute: “Hail to the Chief who in triumph advances! / Honored and blessed be the ever-green Pine!”


Read more:
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/w ... NjQwMTQ3S0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Wed Jan 04, 2017 3:25 pm
by ajsuff
.................................. from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1793, Lucretia Coffin was born. Known better as Lucretia Mott, the abolitionist, women's rights activist and social reformer is perhaps most famous for helping organize the Seneca Falls Convention. Read about the groundbreaking Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions that came out of the gathering.


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-new ... NjQwMTQ3S0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Thu Jan 05, 2017 12:25 pm
by ajsuff
................................ from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1847, Samuel Colt sold his first revolvers to the United States government. The single-action revolver was then subsequently mass-produced to be used in the Mexican-American war. Did you know before the Colt six-shooter, it was the Colt five-shooter? Find out why the weapon evolved to carry an extra bullet.

Samuel Colt was a clever marketer as well as a talented inventor


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-new ... ODUwODc4S0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Mon Jan 09, 2017 10:40 am
by ajsuff
.............................. from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1776, the Continental Congress published the Tory Act. The controversial piece of legislation was intended to show which colonists remained loyal to the Crown. It also called for Tories, who stood with the Crown, to be disarmed, and possibly even imprisoned. Tories are still around today. Check out the modern loyalists who still raise their glasses to King George.


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/d ... NDAxMzcxS0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 10:47 am
by ajsuff
.............................. from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1793, French inventor Jean-Pierre Blanchard lifted off in the first hot-air balloon flight in America. He departed from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and landed safely in Woodbury, New Jersey. Blanchard wasn't the only ballooner in his family; his wife Sophie Blanchard also was a high-flying aeronaut. Find out how they helped start a hot trend that swept through Europe: "balloonomania."


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/s ... NzU5NzczS0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Sat Jan 14, 2017 11:18 am
by ajsuff
............................ from the Smithsonian ..............................

Quiz: How Much Do You Know About Presidential Food?

In honor of Inauguration Day, here's a little quiz to see how much you know about presidential food history


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-cult ... NzUyMTkzS0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Tue Jan 17, 2017 9:17 pm
by ajsuff
............................ from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1806, James Madison Randolph, the grandson of Thomas Jefferson, became the first child born in the White House. Martha Randolph's son, James holds a special place in the annals of White House history, but he's far from the only offspring to have caused a stir in the White House. Find out the history of President Cleveland's "problem child."

Not even a specific allegation of philandering, illicit pregnancy and coverup barred Grover Cleveland from the White House


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/p ... NDYxMjQ0S0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Wed Jan 25, 2017 11:07 am
by ajsuff
........................ from the Smithsonian ..............................

In 1793, French inventor Jean-Pierre Blanchard lifted off in the first hot-air balloon flight in America. He departed from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and landed safely in Woodbury, New Jersey. Blanchard wasn't the only ballooner in his family; his wife Sophie Blanchard also was a high-flying aeronaut.


Find out how they helped start a hot trend that swept through Europe: “balloonomania.”
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/s ... NTE4ODE0S0

Re: Trivia

Posted: Thu Jan 26, 2017 10:51 am
by ajsuff
............................... from House Beautiful ..........................

9 Interesting Things You Never Knew About Easter - Apparently, the tradition of bonnets stems from a very popular pop culture moment.

Today, Easter is all about egg hunts and chocolate bunnies. But as you stock up on candy, plastic eggs, and more, you might have wondered where these traditions came from. Here are just a few interesting facts behind a few of Easter's most common symbols, customs, and....candies?


Learn more at:
http://www.housebeautiful.com/entertain ... ing-facts/